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  • President Donald Trump told reporters Wednesday that he will “be signing something in a little while” to address family separations at the U.S.-Mexico border. >> Read more trending news “We want to keep families together, it’s very important,” Trump said. 'I’ll be doing something that’s somewhat preemptive and ultimately will be matched by legislation I’m sure.”  It was not immediately clear what the president planned to sign. Trump has repeatedly called on Congress to change laws that he says mandates the family separations. There is no law that requires children be separated from parents at the border. He blamed Democrats for the continued separations in a Wednesday morning tweet, but he added that he was “working on something.” The Associated Press reported Wednesday that Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen was drafting an executive action for Trump that would allow the Department of Homeland Security to keep migrant families together at the border. Nielsen does not believe Congress will act to resolve the issue of migrant family separations, the AP reported, citing two unidentified sources familiar with the matter. She’s working with officials from other agencies, including the Justice Department and the Department of Health and Human Services, to draft the executive action. The Trump administration in April directed prosecutors to pursue cases against all people suspected of crossing the border illegally as part of a “zero tolerance” immigration enforcement policy. Parents have been separated from their children as they face prosecution. Nearly 2,000 children were separated from their families over a six-week period in April and May, according to the Department of Homeland Security. The executive action Nielson is drafting “wouldn’t end the zero tolerance policy, but would aim to keep families together and ask the Department of Defense to help house the detained families,” according to the AP. Check back for updates to this developing story.
  • After meeting with President Donald Trump on Tuesday, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, (R-Kentucky), said that he and the rest of the Republican caucus plan to work on legislation that would end the practice of separating migrant families at the country’s southern border.  “I support, and all of the members of the Republican conference support, a plan to keep families together while their immigration status is determined,” McConnell said. >>President Trump to reverse course on immigrant family separations McConnell is the highest-ranking Republican to publicly disagree with Trump on the “zero tolerance” immigration policy announced in April by U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions. The policy calls for adults illegally entering the country to be criminally prosecuted.  >> Read more trending news Children who accompany those arrested for illegally entering the country are separated from their parents or guardians and taken into the custody of the Department of Health and Human Services.  Photographs of children behind fenced areas inside large facilities and an audio tape of children crying for their parents have led legislators to call for Trump to immediately end the policy of separating migrant families. According to immigration records, during April and May, federal authorities separated at least 1,995 children from parents apprehended crossing the border illegally. >>Clergy group brings church charges of child abuse, immorality against Jeff Sessions over zero-tolerance policy Sen. Ted Curz, (R-Texas), introduced a bill Tuesday that would require children be kept with their family members unless the child appeared to be in danger or the victim of human trafficking. The bill calls for doubling the number of federal immigration judges and authorize new family shelters. Also on Tuesday, Sen. Orrin Hatch, (R-Utah), and a dozen other Republican senators sent a letter to Sessions asking him to stop the policy of separating migrant families while Congress works on a solution to the issue. The letter read in part: 'The immediate cause of the crisis is your Department's recent institution of a 'zero tolerance' policy under which all adults who enter the United States illegally are referred for prosecution, regardless of whether they are accompanied by minor children. We support the administration's efforts to enforce our immigration laws, but we cannot support implementation of a policy that results in the categorical forced separation of minor children from their parents.” Those senators signing the letter: Sen. Lamar Alexander (Tennessee) Sen. John Boozman (Arkansas) Sen. Bill Cassidy (Louisiana) Sen. Susan Collins (Maine) Sen. Bob Corker (Tennessee) Sen. Cory Gardner (Colorado) Sen. Dean Heller (Nevada) Sen. James Lankford (Oklahoma) Sen. John McCain (Arizona) Sen. Lisa Murkowski (Alaska) Sen. Rob Portman (Ohio) Sen. Pat Roberts (Kansas) Here are some other Republicans who have spoken out against the policy: Florida Sen. Marco Rubio Missouri Sen. Roy Blunt “We clearly have a border security problem,' Blunt said in a statement to KCUR. 'I agree with Mrs. [Laura] Bush and Mrs. [Melania] Trump that separating families does not meet the standard of who we are as a country. Strengthening our border security and upholding our laws in a manner consistent with our values will help facilitate progress toward addressing all aspects of our broken immigration system.” Kansas Rep. Kevin Yoder “As the son of a social worker, I know the human trauma that comes with children being separated from their parents,” he tweeted. “It takes a lasting, and sometimes even irreversible toll on the child’s well-being. That’s why I’m demanding that Attorney General Sessions halt the practice of family separation at the border immediately as Congress works toward legislative solutions.” Texas Sen. John Cornyn “Parents who are awaiting court proceedings shouldn’t have to do so separated from their children, and children shouldn’t be taken from their parents and left frightened and confused about where they are and what is transpiring around them.” Colorado Rep. Mike Coffman “This afternoon I reached out to Sen. Diane Feinstein’s office to let her know I want to help her put a stop to this human rights disaster at the border. If that means introducing her bill in the House, I’d be honored to stand with her. If there is a better bill sponsor to get this done, or if there is a better approach from Sen. Ben Sasse, I’m open to all reasonable options. Tearing children from the arms of parents and then isolating them alone is antithetical to the America I grew up in, and to the America I have fought many times to defend. This isn’t who we are. My colleagues should mark their words and this moment — history won’t remember well those who support the continuation of this policy.” Nebraska Sen. Ben Sasse  “The president should immediately end this family separation policy.” Texas Rep. Will Hurd “This is part of the problem with this administration on this policy. There's different elements of the government that don't understand what's really going on. Kids are being separated from their parents. In the last two months, there's been about 2,000. The previous year, it was almost 700. And a hundred of those kids were under the age of 4. This is just absolutely unacceptable. Taking kids from their mothers is not preventing terrorists or drugs from coming into this country.” Ohio Rep. Steve Stivers  “I will support other means to stop unnecessary separation of children from their parents.” New Jersey Rep. Chris Smith 'There is nothing more important than protecting vulnerable children from physical and psychological harm. The policy of forcibly separating children from their parent or parents at the U.S. border is seriously wrong, hurts families, and needs to immediately end. 'The departments of Justice and Homeland Security must halt the practice of family separations, except in the cases of criminal felonies by an adult including rape, murder, sexual assault on a minor, or human trafficking.' Not calling out the Guard Governors of at least 13 states have said they will not send their state’s National Guardsmen to help secure the southern border, according to a story from The New York Times. The governors of Connecticut, Delaware, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont and Virginia have all said they will not deploy National Guard troops to the southern border.  Governors of other states have said they will not use state resources to separate adults from children at the border. In April, Trump called on the country’s governors to deploy more National Guard troops to the border to help with border security. State governors control National Guard deployment. Most of the governors who have said they will either recall or refuse to send troops are Democrats. Two of the governors who have spoken publicly about National Guard troop deployment to the border are Republicans – Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan and Massachusetts Gov. Charlie Baker. The role of National Guard troops is limited. National Guard troops are forbidden by the Posse Comiatus Act from detaining suspects, from using force or from other law enforcement functions. Their role at the border would be one of providing support and possibly helping in surveillance.
  • Under pressure from lawmakers in both parties, President Donald Trump on Wednesday said he would sign a new executive order to stop the forced separation of illegal immigrant children and parents at the southern border with Mexico, a ‘zero tolerance’ policy that had been put in place by his administration in early May. “We want to keep families together, it’s very important, I’ll be signing something in a little while to do that,” the President said, meeting with a number of GOP lawmakers from the House and Senate. “We’re keeping families together, but we have to keep our borders strong,” Mr. Trump added. It wasn’t immediately clear what Mr. Trump would sign, but the action would run counter to arguments that he and other White House officials had said for days – that only the Congress could make the needed changes on immigration dealing with family separation. President Trump: 'We want security and insist on security for our country. And we will have that. At the same time, we have compassion. We want to keep families together. It's very important. I'll be signing something in a little while that's going to do that.' pic.twitter.com/TTLGTw8rtG — CSPAN (@cspan) June 20, 2018 The President’s move came amid a growing firestorm of criticism in Congress from members of both parties in the Congress, stirred by stories of young children taken away from their parents. “This must stop NOW,” tweeted Rep. Justin Amash (R-MI), as he noted a story from his home state, where an 8-month old baby had been brought, after being taken from her parents. This must stop NOW. Only one person has the power to do so while Congress works through legislation: @POTUS @realDonaldTrump. https://t.co/1FWCuJMB1f — Justin Amash (@justinamash) June 20, 2018 “He can sign an executive order today,” said Sen. Bill Nelson (D-FL), who was blocked on Tuesday from visiting a group of detained children at a federal facility in Homestead, Florida. “This shameful chapter in American history lies with the President and his pen,” Nelson said, arguing the President started these separations, and should halt them. “We must stop the madness, and stop it now,” said Rep. John Lewis (D-GA). “America is weakened in the eyes of the world,” added Rep. Hank Johnson (D-GA). “This is a policy straight from the pit of hell,” said Sen. Bob Casey (D-PA). There's nothing in the law that requires children be taken from their parents. There's nothing in the law that requires them to rip an infant from a parent's arms. The decision to enact this shameful policy was a decision made by this administration and this administration alone. pic.twitter.com/8RKeBz9E6g — Senator Bill Nelson (@SenBillNelson) June 20, 2018 GOP leaders also made clear they wanted the Trump Administration to change course. “As I said last week, we do not want children taken away from their parents,” said House Speaker Paul Ryan, as he urged GOP lawmakers to unite behind a pair of immigration bills which are expected to be voted on Thursday. But while the Speaker and other Republicans said provisions in those bills would fix the family separation matter – those plans would not advance through the Senate – making it unlikely that Congress could anything done on the family separation matter. The change on illegal immigrant families came in early May, when Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced a “zero tolerance” policy dealing with those illegally coming over the southern border. “Today we are here to send a message to the world: we are not going to let this country be overwhelmed,” Sessions said in that May 7 speech.
  • A 17-year-old was shot and killed by police in East Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, on Tuesday night after he allegedly ran away from a traffic stop on foot, authorities said. >> Read more trending news  Police have not officially identified the teenager, but community sources told WPXI he is Antwon Rose. He attended Woodland Hills High School last year. >> Visit WPXI.com for the latest on this developing story According to the Allegheny County Police Department, Rose got out of a vehicle that matched the description of a vehicle seen near a shooting that occurred shortly before 8:30 a.m. on Kirkpatrick Avenue in North Braddock. The vehicle, which police said had damage from bullets to the back window, was stopped near Grandview Avenue and Howard Street. An officer from the East Pittsburgh Police Department was handcuffing the driver when two males ran from the car, police said. One of those males was Rose, according to officials. Rose was taken to McKeesport Hospital, where he was pronounced dead. The Allegheny County Police Department is asking the other person who ran away from the vehicle to turn himself in 'so that he can give a comprehensive description of what occurred.' The victim in the North Braddock shooting, a 22-year-old man, was treated for his injuries and released from an area trauma center. The Allegheny County Police Homicide Unit is investigating both incidents. 
  • Michael Vines has a gun tattooed on his forehead, but that’s not the weapon that put him behind bars in South Carolina. Police in Greenville reported Tuesday that Vines was involved in a recent car crash, after which city firefighters said they saw him toss a weapon into the grass nearby. The firefighters reported it to police officers, who recovered the gun, described as a fully loaded Smith & Wesson .38-caliber revolver.  Vines, whose mugshot shows a tattoo of a handgun in the middle of his forehead, is federally prohibited from having a gun, police officials said. He was charged with unlawful carrying of a firearm, as well as driving under a suspended license and speeding.  “The real weapon was placed in property and evidence,” police officials said on the department’s Facebook page.  >> Read more trending news The department’s social media followers couldn’t resist a few jokes at Vines’ expense. One man asked if someone “held a gun to his head” to make him get the tattoo.  Another man offered this hypothetical exchange: “COP: ‘Sir, do you have any guns on you?’ THIS GUY: ‘No.’ COP: ‘Are you sure?’THIS GUY: ‘Absolutely. No way.’ COP: ‘Are you suuuuuuuurrrrreeeee?’ (Taps him on the forehead.)” “Remorse written all over his forehead,” a commenter said. “No, wait. Nope, that’s a gun. My bad.” Police officials did not say why Vines is prohibited from possessing a gun. 

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