ON AIR NOW

LISTEN NOW

Weather

cloudy-day
62°
Cloudy
H 68° L 63°
  • cloudy-day
    62°
    Current Conditions
    Cloudy. H 68° L 63°
  • cloudy-day
    67°
    Afternoon
    Cloudy. H 68° L 63°
  • cloudy-day
    64°
    Evening
    Cloudy. H 68° L 63°
LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

The latest top stories

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

The latest traffic report

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

The latest forecast

00:00 | 00:00

Jacksonville, FL Entertainment

Upcoming Events See All

See More

The Latest News Headlines

  • U.S. marshals caught the woman dubbed “Losing Streak Lois” in Texas near the U.S.-Mexico border on Thursday after a multi-state crime spree, authorities said Thursday. >> Read more trending news Lois Riess, 56, was alone when she was captured in a restaurant on South Padre Island around 8:30 p.m. local time, the Lee County Sheriff's Office told CNN. Reiss was wanted in connection in two murders, including the murder of her husband in Minnesota. 'I promised all along that Lois Riess would end up in a pair of handcuffs,' Lee County Undersheriff Carmine Marceno said in a statement. 'Tonight, she sits in a jail cell in Texas. We are working as expeditiously as possible to bring her back to Lee County to face murder charges.' Riess was last seen April 8 in the area of Corpus Christi, Texas, following what is believed to be a multistate homicide case. She was sought on murder and theft charges in the slaying of Pamela Hutchinson, of Bradenton, Florida, who was found shot to death April 9 in a condominium in which she was staying in Fort Myers Beach, Florida.  Riess, who got her nickname from Minnesota law enforcement officers  for her penchant for gambling, is also a person of interest in the killing of her husband, David Riess, who was found shot to death March 23 on the couple’s worm farm in Blooming Prairie.  In each shooting, the victim had been dead for several days when the body was found. Authorities also believe Lois Riess used the same weapon in both cases.  >> Related story: Minnesota grandma sought in deaths of husband, Florida ‘lookalike’ killed for ID The U.S. Marshals Service on Tuesday had updated the search for Riess to major status and announced a $5,000 reward for her capture. Another $1,000 in reward money was made available by Southwest Florida Crime Stoppers.   Florida investigators said Riess killed Hutchinson, 59, for her identity. The women, who were strangers before Riess befriended Hutchinson, bore a striking resemblance to one another.  Surveillance footage from the Smokin’ Oyster Brewery, located two blocks from Hutchinson’s condo at the Marina Village at Snug Harbor, shows Riess smiling and chatting with a blonde woman in a hat who Lee County Sheriff’s Office detectives have identified as Hutchinson.  Hutchinson’s cousin on Monday posted an image from the surveillance footage to Facebook, side by side with an undated image of Hutchinson wearing that same hat as in the footage.  Officials with the U.S. Marshals Service said investigators believe Hutchinson was killed on or around April 5, when the surveillance footage at the bar was shot.  Lee County officials also on Tuesday released several snippets of surveillance video, including one piece that shows Riess, wearing the same blue shirt seen in the bar video, calmly walking away from Marina Village toward the parking lot. She is seen on another video driving away in Hutchinson’s white 2005 Acura TL. Hutchinson’s keys, identification, cash and credit cards were also missing when her body was found. The News-Press in Fort Myers reported Tuesday that sometime after Hutchinson’s death, Riess went to a Wells Fargo branch there and used Hutchinson’s identification to withdraw $5,000 from the slain woman’s account.  See the original footage of Riess chatting with Pamela Hutchinson, obtained by the News-Press, below.  Riess was next spotted in Ocala, about 215 miles north of Fort Myers, where more surveillance footage released Tuesday shows her driving up to a Hilton hotel in Hutchinson’s stolen car and checking in as a guest. Again, she is wearing the blue top seen in previous videos, as well as a light-colored fedora-style hat with a black band. Lee County Sheriff’s Office officials told the News-Press that Riess stayed in the hotel the nights of April 6 and 7.   Riess used Hutchinson’s identity to check into the hotel around 8 p.m. on April 6. She also used the victim’s identification to withdraw another $500 from Hutchinson’s bank account at an Ocala bank.   “She’s confident, doesn’t look over her shoulder, like she’s not hiding anything,” Kinsey told the Star Tribune of Riess’ demeanor in the videos. “She was very nonchalant.” >> Related story: New footage released of ‘killer grandma’ suspected in 2 homicides; $6,000 reward offered for capture The fugitive was next spotted in the stolen Acura in Louisiana, where an attempt to get $200 at a gas station failed, the News-Press said.  Kinsey said Riess was also spotted on surveillance images April 7 and 8 in casinos in Louisiana.  “She went from casino to casino to make money, or because she is addicted to it,” Kinsey said. “She is consumed by it.” The final definite sighting of Riess was the following day, April 8 in Refugio, Texas, about 40 miles north of Corpus Christi. Corpus Christi is about 150 miles from the Mexico border.  The Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension, which has been searching for Riess since late last month, described her as a white woman with brown eyes and pale blonde hair. She is about 5 feet 5 inches tall and weighs about 165 pounds.  Riess has been on the run since mid-March, when she is suspected of gunning down her husband, David Riess, on their rural worm farm before stealing $11,000 from his personal and business accounts. Deputies with the Dodge County Sheriff’s Office found him after his business partner reported that he had not been seen or heard from in several weeks.   Lois Riess was nowhere to be found, but investigators learned she visited a casino in Iowa on her way out of the Midwest, investigators said. She is charged with grand theft in connection with her husband’s slaying.  Dodge County investigators are also anticipated to file murder charges against her sometime this week.  Riess was initially linked to Hutchinson’s slaying, in part, because her family’s white Cadillac Escalade, which she was believed to be driving after her husband’s murder, was found abandoned in a county park in Fort Myers Beach, the News-Press reported.  Court records in Minnesota also show that Riess, who was named guardian of her disabled sister in 2012, stole more than $78,000 from her before being caught three years later.  Lee County Undersheriff Carmine Marceno described Riess to NBC News earlier this week as a “stone-cold killer” who authorities fear might kill again when she runs out of resources.  “She smiles and looks like anyone’s mother or grandmother,” Marceno said. “And yet she’s calculated, she’s targeted and an absolute cold-blooded killer.”
  • Bowing to demands from Republicans in the House, the Justice Department on Thursday night gave lawmakers memos written by former FBI Director James Comey after meetings and phone calls with President Donald Trump, with the resulting leaks only amplifying Comey’s story that Mr. Trump had pressed him repeatedly about the probe into Russian interference in the 2016 elections. And in classic Washington fashion – the memos were leaked almost immediately to news organizations. You can read the set of memos from Comey – written soon after meetings directly with the President, or after phone calls with Mr. Trump. There had been concerns that sharing the memos with Congress might cause problems for the investigation of Special Counsel Robert Mueller – but press reports on Thursday night indicated otherwise, and a reading of the materials did not reveal a new treasure trove of information. And more than anything, they only seemed to bring the focus more on President Trump. It's almost like the House GOP wanted the Comey memos released to embarrass their party leader. — Erick Erickson (@EWErickson) April 20, 2018 Here are ten things we learned from the memos written by the former FBI Director. 1. Trump praises Comey at first meeting at Trump Tower. Before the former FBI Director could get to the subject of the Steele Dossier, the two men had some chit chat one-on-one. Comey said the President-Elect complimented the FBI chief on how he had handled the difficult situation involving the Hillary Clinton email investigation. “He said I was repeatedly put in impossible positions,” Comey recounted, quoting Trump as saying, “they hated you for what you did later, but what choice did you have?” Comey said the President-Elect said ‘he hoped I planned to stay on.’ 2. Comey moves into the Steele Dossier. With other top officials out of the room at Trump Tower, Comey then described briefing the President-Elect on the contents of the Steele Dossier, expressing concerns that it could soon leak in the media. “I said, the Russians allegedly had tapes of him and prostitutes,” Comey wrote, saying that Mr. Trump said, “there were no prostitutes.” Comey said he told the President-Elect that the FBI was not investigating these stories, but that “our job was to protect the President from efforts to coerce him.” 3. The late January “loyalty” dinner. After President Trump had been sworn into office, he invited Comey to the White House for dinner – just the two of them – telling Comey that even Chief of Staff Reince Priebus did not know of their sit down. Comey said he told Trump, “I was not on anybody’s side politically.” After a detailed discussion of the impact of the Clinton email investigation on the campaign – in which they disagreed on whether there was a case against Hillary Clinton, Comey said the President made a clear point. “He replied that he needed loyalty and expected loyalty.” 4. Comey relates Trump displeasure with Flynn. One interesting side story from the late January dinner was when Comey related how the President had been angry with his National Security Adviser Michael Flynn, for evidently not informing the President that another world leader had called after the inauguration. “In telling the story, the President pointed his fingers at his head and said “the guy has serious judgment issues.”” Comey then notes that he never gave Mr. Trump any indication of the FBI interest in Flynn – or the fact that agents had interviewed Flynn just a day before about his contacts with the Russian Ambassador to the United States. 5. A meeting with Chief of Staff Reince Priebus. One memo from Comey detailed a meeting with the President’s Chief of Staff, who asked the FBI Director if there was an investigation going on into the President’s National Security Adviser. “Do you have a FISA order on Mike Flynn?” Comey quoted Priebus as asking. Later, their conversation went over the Hillary Clinton email investigation, and Comey’s late announcement which roiled the campaign. “At some point I added that it also wasn’t my fault that Huma Abedin forwarded emails to Anthony Weiner.” 6. Golden showers, hookers, and Putin. After meeting with Priebus, Comey was taken by the Oval Office for a quick visit with the President. There, Mr. Trump complained about leaks of his phone calls with foreign leaders, and again vented his frustration about details from the Steele Dossier. “The President brought up the “Golden Showers thing” and said it really bothered him,” Comey recounted. “The President said ‘the hookers thing’ is nonsense but that Putin had told ‘we have some of the most beautiful hookers in the world.'” 7. Trump presses Comey on Michael Flynn. In portions of the memos which had already been leaked, Comey describes how a broader meeting on homeland security ended, and then others left him one-on-one with Mr. Trump. “He began by saying he wanted to ‘talk about Mike Flynn,'” Comey recounts, adding later that the President said he had ‘other concerns’ about Flynn, but was aggravated about the leaks concerning his former National Security Adviser. But the President then returned to Flynn. “I hope you can let this go,” was how Comey remembered what the President had said in this February 14, 2017 meeting. 8. Trump urges Comey to ‘lift the cloud.’ Again, these details had been leaked previously, as Comey recounted a phone conversation in which the President complained about the Russia investigation, saying at one point that he would have won a health care vote in the House if not for the controversy over the Trump-Russia probe about the 2016 elections. Comey noted the President again returned to an issue that clearly aggravated him – “can you imagine me, hookers?” Comey’s memo also seems to say that the President was going to file a lawsuit against former British intelligence agent Christopher Steele, who had assembled the dossier. No such suit was ever filed. 9. More about loyalty to the President. In an April 2017 phone call, Comey says the President pressed him to publicly confirm that he (Mr. Trump) is not under investigation related to Russian interference in the 2016 election. “He spoke for a bit about why it was so important,” Comey recounted, saying the President feared it was overshadowing the work of his new administration. “They keep bringing up the Russia thing as an excuse for losing the election,” Comey wrote. Then Comey said the President pressed him again. “Because I have been very loyal to you, very loyal, we had that thing you know,” Comey quoted Mr. Trump. In a footnote to his own memo, Comey seems perplexed as to what the President was referring to. 10. The release may on spur more questions. Republicans in the House had been pressing for the release of these memos from Comey for months, convinced that they would show wrongdoing by the former FBI Director. Instead, the full memos added more context to what was going on during the first few months of the Trump Administration with regards to the Russia investigation, and seemed to give more hints about what the FBI knew of the Steele Dossier, and how Trump officials were worried about who was being investigated. Comey appears to have told Reince Preibus on Feb 8/17 that parts of the dossier had already been corroborated by the intellgence community. pic.twitter.com/GJivuaKAh5 — Dafna Linzer (@DafnaLinzer) April 20, 2018  
  • Rhuné Callahan wasn’t expecting to find key marks on her truck when she woke up Tuesday morning. “I saw the scratches on the hood first,” Callahan said. “You come up, see more scratches and you see ‘hate you.'” The words “hate you” are visible on the front side passenger door. Callahan spotted dents near the bed of her Nissan Titan.  She noticed the vandalism the day after she said she was the target of someone’s road rage on State Road 312 near State Road A1A. “This gray truck--at that point, I didn’t notice what kind of truck it was-- started hollering at me, “You’re driving too freaking bleep bleep slow,'” Callahan said. She said the man then pulled up next to her and called her a “stupid N word.' They argued back and forth and she thought the incident was over. “I proceed home and get on my driveway and get out (of) my truck, proceed to my door (and) I hear 'you stupid N word,'” Callahan said.  She rushed inside her home and had a friend pick her up. According to a St. Johns County Sheriff’s Office incident report, a neighbor heard a loud truck a few minutes before 8:30 p.m. Monday. Her camera captured an image of a truck. Callahan got back home late that evening and didn’t notice the vandalism that night. It wasn’t until the next day that she saw all the key marks. Callahan said she bought her pickup truck with an inheritance her parents left her. “It hurts me that the gift upon my parents’ death is destroyed. It won’t ever be the same because he touched it and violated it,” Callahan said. Callahan described the car as being silver or gray, possibly a Dodge Ram, with tinted windows. She said the driver is a bald white man in his 40s, who was wearing a hunting-style cap.  She said she’s changed her routes to avoid bumping into the same man again. She now fears for her safety. “I’m speaking out for people to look out within the neighborhood, in the area, so I could be helped. He probably done did this to somebody else,” Callahan said. Callahan said, had she noticed she was being followed she never would have pulled, into her driveway.  According to the police report, the damage to the vehicle will cost around $1,000 to fix.  If you’re ever involved in a road rage incident, call 911 right away and stay on the phone with the dispatcher until you get to a safe place.
  • A Manhattan nanny accused of stabbing to death the two young children in her care more than five years ago has been convicted of murder after jurors rejected her claim that she was too mentally ill to know what she was doing. Yoselyn Ortega, 55, will be sentenced May 14 for first-degree murder and second-degree murder in the deaths of Leo Krim, 2, and his sister, Lucia “Lulu” Krim, 6, according to The New York Times. The guilty verdict was announced Wednesday after two days of jury deliberation.  Ortega, who was silent as the verdict was read, faces life in prison.  >> Related story: ‘You’re evil!’ Mother of slain children screams at nanny on trial in grisly deaths The children’s father, Kevin Krim, sat in the front row for the verdict, holding hands with two alternate jurors who were released from duty before deliberation began, the Times reported. He wept and rocked back and forth when the verdict was read. One of the jurors took his glasses off, wiping away his own tears.  In a Facebook post following the verdict, Krim thanked the judge and jurors, as well as prosecutors and police investigators, for their dedication to seeing justice done.  “This process has been very challenging for us, but it has also reaffirmed our love of New York: a city that Lulu and Leo loved dearly,” Krim wrote. “We got through this trial because of our family, our friends, our fellow New Yorkers and the loving memory of Lulu and Leo’s lives.” Krim also said that he and his wife, Marina Krim, are supporting state legislation that would make it a crime to falsify the job application and references of someone working in child care. He accused Ortega’s family of deceiving them about her qualifications, saying they “remain wholly unaccountable for their role in the murders of (the Krim) children.” Ortega’s six-week murder trial was fraught with emotion from the very first witness. Marina Krim took the stand first, testifying about finding her children’s bloody, lifeless bodies in a bathtub Oct. 25, 2012, at the family’s Upper West Side apartment.  She had taken the couple’s younger daughter, 3-year-old Nessie, to a swimming lesson and the pair then went to Lulu’s dance studio to pick the little girl up. When the frantic mother realized Lulu never showed up, she rushed home.  She searched room to room, finding no sign of her children until she reached a bathroom.  “I go down, I walk down the hall and I see the light on under the back of the door, and I’m like, ‘Oh God, it’s so quiet in here, oh God. Why is it so … quiet?’ And I open the door … and I open the door, oh God,” Marina Krim said, weeping, The Associated Press reported at the start of the trial.  Inside the bathroom, she found Lulu and Leo in the bathtub, both covered with blood. Krim testified that she knew immediately that Lulu was dead because her eyes were open and fixed.  Ortega stabbed herself in the neck as Marina Krim walked into the room.  Lulu suffered at least 30 stab wounds and her brother, who could not defend himself, suffered five, prosecutors said. Both children’s throats were slashed so deeply that first responders initially thought they had been decapitated.  Kevin Krim testified about coming home from a business trip and seeing his children’s bodies at a hospital, CBS News reported.  “They still had this perfect skin and these long eyelashes,” Kevin Krim said. “They had, like, sandy brown hair. You could see they tried really hard to wash all the blood out, but there was still kind of an auburn tint to it that I remember to this day.” Weeping could be heard throughout the courtroom, including from the jury box, CBS News said. “It’s worse than you’d imagine,” Krim testified. “It’s worse.” At a news conference following the verdict, Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus R. Vance Jr. praised the jurors for their “diligence throughout this incredibly difficult and heartbreaking trial,” the Times reported.  Vance said that the Krims lived every parent’s worst nightmare. Jurors seemed to agree. “As a father of two children myself, I can’t imagine. No parent should have to experience the loss of a child,” a teary-eyed juror, David Curtis, said. “This was a very difficult decision for us. There were some raised voices and a lot of tears.” The Times reported that Ortega’s defense painted a portrait of a mentally ill woman who had been suffering from delusions and hallucinations since her teen years in the Dominican Republic. Her lawyers argued that she heard voices, including that of Satan, telling her to kill the children. Two defense psychiatrists testified that Ortega was having a severe psychotic break when she stabbed Lulu and Leo and could not remember killing them. >> Read more trending news A prosecution expert testified, however, that Ortega suffered from anxiety and depression, but was not paranoid or delusional when she committed the crime, the Times said. The forensic psychologist played for jurors a 2016 interview he had with Ortega in which she denied hearing voices. It was not until months later that she claimed the devil made her kill the children, the newspaper reported.  Prosecutors argued that Ortega, who was jealous of Marina Krim’s life and wealth, planned the murders. They pointed to the fact that she left a purse holding valuables, ID cards and keepsakes for her own teenage son with her sister. She had also recently pleaded with her sister to take care of her son and “raise him well,” the state argued.  Ortega’s son had arrived in the U.S. to finish high school in the months before the murders, putting added financial pressure on his mother, who enrolled him in a private school.  Despite witness testimony from Ortega’s family and friends about a series of mental breakdowns over the years, the only written documentation of mental issues came from a therapist Ortega visited three days before the murders, the Times reported. The therapist testified that he saw no signs of delusional thinking and that Ortega said nothing about hearing voices.  Instead, she talked about stress and feelings of failure in her relationship with her son, who she left with family in the Dominican Republic when he was 4 years old.  Marina Krim testified that, in the past, she and her husband had bought Ortega plane tickets to visit her family back home and even made the trip themselves to meet her loved ones.  Ortega also told police investigators immediately after the killings that she hurt the children because she had money problems and was angry at the Krims, the AP reported. She complained about a shifting schedule and having to work as a cleaning woman when she did not want to.  ABC News reported that some of those extra cleaning jobs were efforts by Krim to help Ortega make more money to better support her son. CBS News reported that, although Ortega showed little to no emotion throughout the trial, she forcefully shook her head and mouthed the word “no” during some testimony -- when it was said that her employers treated her well.  The Krims, who started the Lulu & Leo Fund following their children’s slayings, have since had two more sons, Felix in 2013 and Linus in 2016.  The Lulu & Leo Fund provides funds for Choose Creativity, which the fund’s Facebook page describes as a curriculum-based initiative that centers on 10 principles of creativity. Working with schools and community organizations, the program brings the initiative to children and families in underserved communities.  As of November, the curriculum was being taught in more than 20 schools and community centers, impacting more than 2,000 students, the page states. 
  • Teal is still not a primary color in the Jags new uniform scheme, but it’s more prominent and just one way they’re seeking to honor the team’s history in the new design. The Jaguars new “Color Rush” uniform will be head-to-toe teal, instead of the gold they’ve been wearing prior years. This is also the first time the team has teal pants, which can be worn at any time. The teal jersey is the official alternate uniform, which is expected to be worn several times over the season. GALLERY:New uniforms for the Jacksonville Jaguars Jaguars President Mark Lamping says there was a few reasons they didn’t make teal a primary color, including that tastes can change. Even more than that, though, they wanted to make sure the teal kept its power. “If you wore them all the time, they’d be a little less special,” he says. The two-tone helmet is gone, in favor of the shine-finished traditional style. There is an elevated “JAX” by the forehead, which the team says shows the connection to the community, and elevated “JAGUARS” at the nape. The uniform also features the Jags logo on the players’ hearts. The numbers are bold and modern, which is supposed to pay homage as well to prior uniforms. The end goal, according to the team, was no-nonsense, classic Jags. “They’re classic, they’re simple, they’re powerful, they’re agile, they’re winning,” says Jaguars owner Shad Khan. There are also a lot of features in the Nike uniforms designed for the benefit of the players, including removing front seams to improve mobility and create fewer grab points for the opposing team. The uniforms are also lighter than the industry standard, which will help players stay cool, and they’re designed to repel water. Additionally, there are new mesh patches over major “sweat zones”, like behind the knee, to provide some ventilation.

The Latest News Videos