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  • Forecasters are keeping an eye on the Gulf of Mexico as Tropical Storm Cristobal takes aim at the northern U.S. Gulf Coast. Tropical Storm Cristobal, the third named storm of the 2020 Atlantic hurricane season, formed Tuesday in the southwest Gulf of Mexico, was downgraded temporarily after making landfall in Mexico and regained tropical storm strength early Saturday. Here are the latest updates: Outer rainbands continue to spread across northern Gulf Coast Update 5 a.m. EDT June 7: The outer rainbands from Tropical Storm Cristobal continued to spread across portions of the northern Gulf Coast, the National Weather Service said Sunday. In its 5 a.m. EDT advisory, the agency said squalls with tropical storm-force winds had reached the mouth of the Mississippi River. The storm, located about 140 miles south-southwest of the river, was moving northward at 12 mph and had maximum sustained winds of 50 mph. Read the full advisory here. Outer rainbands from Cristobal move across parts of Gulf Coast Update 8:16 p.m. EDT June 6: Outer rainbands from Cristobal are moving across parts of the Gulf Coast prompting a storm surge warning, the National Weather Service said. A storm surge warning is in effect for parts of Mississippi, Louisiana and Florida including from the mouth of the Mississippi River to Ocean Springs, Mississippi; Lake Borge, Mississippi; Intracoastal City, Louisiana to the Florida line in Okaloosa/Walton County; Lake Pontchartrain and Lake Maurepas. A storm surge watch is also in effect in Morgan City, Louisiana. Weather along Gulf expected to deteriorate Saturday night Update 2:02 p.m. EDT June 6: Tropical storm Cristobal inched closer to the northern Gulf coastline Saturday afternoon, and the National Hurricane Center said in its 2 p.m. EDT intermediate advisory that weather conditions “could deteriorate” sometime Saturday night. At 2 p.m., Cristobal’s strength and speed remained the same, with maximum sustained winds of 50 mph. The storm was moving north at 12 mph, and its center was located 310 miles south of the mouth of the Mississippi River. A tropical storm warning remained in effect from Intracoastal City, Louisiana, to the Okaloosa/Walton County line on the Florida Panhandle, the National Hurricane Center said. Lake Pontchartrain and Lake Maurepas also were under a tropical storm warning. A storm surge warning is in effect from the mouth of the Mississippi River to Ocean Springs, Mississippi, the National Hurricane Center said. The next advisory by the National Hurricane Center is 5 p.m. EDT. Cristobal continues to churn northward in Gulf of Mexico Update 11:03 a.m. EDT June 6, 2020: Tropical storm Cristobal continued to churn northward in the Gulf of Mexico, packing sustained winds of 50 mph, according to the National Hurricane Center’s 11 a.m. advisory. Cristobal was moving north at 12 mph, and the eye of the storm was located 345 miles south of the mouth of the Mississippi River. A tropical storm warning was extended and now includes the area from Intracoastal City, Louisiana, to the Okaloosa/Walton County line on the Florida Panhandle, the National Hurricane Center said. Cristobal strengthens slightly; tropical storm warnings posted Update 8:10 a.m. EDT June 6, 2020: Tropical Storm Cristobal strengthened slightly Saturday morning, according to the National Hurricane Center’s intermediate advisory at 8 a.m. EDT. The third named storm of the Atlantic hurricane season now packs sustained winds of 50 mph and continues to move north. The forward speed of the storm has slowed to 12 mph. The storm was located 365 miles south of the mouth of the Mississippi River and could impact parts of the Gulf coastal areas later Saturday. A tropical storm warning is in effect for east of Morgan City, Louisiana to the Okaloosa/Walton County line on the Florida Panhandle, the National Hurricane Center said. A tropical storm watch is in effect for Intracoastal City, Louisiana, to Morgan City. Cristobal upgraded to tropical storm, takes aim at US Gulf Coast Update 5:50 a.m. EDT June 6: After weakening to a tropical depression, a re-energized Cristobal regained tropical storm strength late Friday and remains on track to impact portions of the norther U.S. Gulf Coast as early as Saturday. According to the U.S. National Hurricane Center’s most current data, Cristobal’s maximum sustained winds are holding steady at 45 mph, and the storm, located about 440 miles south of the mouth of the Mississippi River, is moving north at 14 mph. A tropical storm warning extends from southwestern Louisiana to the western Florida Panhandle, and tropical storm force winds are expected to reach coastal communities by late Saturday night. Although Cristobal is expected to strengthen as it approaches land, the storm is not anticipated to gain hurricane-force strength before making landfall. Substantial rain, with totals as high as 10 inches in isolated spots, is the primary threat at this time. Tropical storm watch issued Update 10:30 a.m. EDT June 5, 2020: A tropical storm watch has been issued for portions of the northern coast of the Gulf of Mexico as Tropical Depression Cristobal moves through Mexico and north toward the Gulf. A tropical storm watch was issued for the northern Gulf of Mexico coast from Intracoastal City, Louisiana, to the Alabama-Florida border, including Lake Pontchartrain and Lake Maurepas. A storm surge warning has been issued from Indian Pass, Florida, to Arepika, Florida, (near Tampa), and from Grand Isle, Louisiana, to Ocean Springs, Mississippi, including Lake Borgne in Louisiana. As of the 10 a.m. Central Standard Time advisory, Cristobal has winds of 35 mph and is 40 miles east of Campeche, Mexico. The storm is heading north at 12 mph. Forecasters expect the storm to gain some strength as it moves over the open waters of the Gulf. Cristobal downgraded for now Update: 12:05 p.m. ET June 4, 2020: Tropical Storm Cristobal has been downgraded to a tropical depression, but forecasters warn that the storm is expected to strengthen and head north into the open waters of the Gulf of Mexico. According to the National Hurricane Center, Cristobal continues to produce heavy rains and “life-threatening flooding.' AT 10 a.m. CT, the center of Cristobal was located 160 miles south-southwest of Campeche, Mexico. “A turn toward the east and northeast is expected later today,” the NHC said. “And a subsequent northward motion should occur through Sunday.” Cristobal has sustained winds at 35 mph with higher gusts. The storm is expected to re-intensify beginning on Friday. Cristobal makes landfall  Update: 10:50 a.m. ET June 3, 2020: Tropical Storm Cristobal made landfall Wednesday along Mexico’s Gulf Coast, according to the National Hurricane Center. The storm, the third of the 2020 Atlantic hurricane season, dumped heavy rains as it came ashore near Atasta, Mexico, just to the west of Ciudad del Carmen, triggering concerns over possible flooding. The storm had sustained winds of 60 mph at landfall. A tropical system becomes a hurricane when it has sustained winds of 74 mph. Cristobal formed Tuesday as remnants of the Pacific Tropical Storm Amanda moved into the southwestern Gulf of Mexico. According to the NHC, the storm was expected to turn north later in the week, and move through the Gulf of Mexico toward the Gulf Coast of the United States. Original story: Tropical Storm Cristobal, the third named storm of the 2020 Atlantic hurricane season, formed Tuesday in the southwest Gulf of Mexico. Cristobal was located approximately 150 miles west-southwest of Campeche, Mexico, sporting maximum winds of 40 mph. The National Hurricane Center issued tropical storm warnings for Campeche to Puerto de Veracruz in Mexico. Tropical storm warnings mean that tropical storm conditions are expected in an area within 24 to 36 hours. According to the NHC, Cristobal could produce “life-threatening heavy rainfall and flooding over portions of Mexico and Central America.” Rainfall totals of 10 to 20 inches could create flood conditions and mudslides in the region, the NHC forecasts. Cristobal’s formation was the earliest occurrence of a third named tropical system in the Atlantic basin in any recorded Atlantic hurricane season. Further strengthening is possible as water temperatures in the Gulf of Mexico are in the low- to mid-80s and there is very little wind shear – two factors that can hinder a storm’s intensity. According to the NHC forecast, the system is likely to make a small loop over southeastern Mexico and then head into the open waters of the Gulf of Mexico. The next advisory will be posted at 4 p.m. ET here.
  • Twelve days after George Floyd’s death, outrage over police violence continues to fuel protests nationwide. Floyd, 46, died May 25 in police custody, and authorities have arrested four Minneapolis police officers in connection with his death. Former officer Derek Chauvin has been charged with second-degree murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter in Floyd’s death. Three other officers – identified as Thomas Lane, J.A. Kueng and Tou Thao – face charges of aiding and abetting second-degree murder and aiding and abetting second-degree manslaughter. Floyd died on Memorial Day after he was detained for questioning regarding a possible forgery in progress. Video of his death caught by bystanders and shared on social media showed Chauvin holding his knee to Floyd’s neck for nearly nine minutes as Floyd pleaded for air. Live updates for Sunday, June 7, continue below: Protesters pull down Confederate statue in Virginia park Update 3:43 a.m. EDT June 7: Protesters in Virginia have taken down a statue of Confederate Gen. Williams Carter Wickham in Richmond’s Monroe Park. According to The Associated Press, a “small group” of people pulled down the statue using ropes late Saturday. It was not immediately clear if the statue sustained any damage or any arrests had been made in connection with the incident. The statue was erected in 1891, the AP reported. Read more here. Hundreds honor George Floyd at North Carolina memorial service Update 2:49 a.m. EDT June 7: Mourners held a private memorial service in George Floyd’s North Carolina hometown Saturday. According to WSOC-TV, the memorial service was held Saturday in Raeford. It included a public viewing from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. and was followed by a private funeral. North Carolina flags were lowered to half-staff Saturday to honor Floyd, who was killed in police custody in Minneapolis on Memorial Day. Floyd was originally from Fayetteville. His death has sparked protests globally as people demanded justice and racial equality. “The unjust killing of George Floyd combined with many other recent and distant events broke open painful wounds,” North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper said. “Racism. Excessive use of police force. Health disparities. Poverty. White supremacy. These are wrong. They are ugly, but they are present. We must deal with them. We will deal with them. George Floyd’s sister, Bridgette, lives in Hoke County, North Carolina. While I cannot bring her brother back, I can work for justice in his name. I assured her that’s what we would do.” WSOC anchor Susanna Black saw hundreds of people lined up to enter the church for the memorial service. Jasmine Maynor, of Raeford, is a first-time mom and was one of many who were moved after seeing Floyd’s body as part of the public viewing. “Just to see someone laying there lifeless for no reason at all,” Maynor said. “He’s from here. He was born here. He has family here. It’s just really different. It hits home.” Paul Anderson drove in from Raleigh for the service. “I look at it like that it could have been me,” he said. “I love being black. I’m proud to be black, but it’s not about black or green or blue. The way the man died was just wrong – flat-out wrong.” Nakia Almond said she has faith in a higher power and believes that is what led her to the service. “This world will not be the same after 2020, God,” Almond said. Floyd’s final memorial service and funeral will be Tuesday in Houston. Seattle police: Officers injured after protesters throw ‘improvised explosives’ Published 1:59 a.m. EDT June 7: Officials with the Seattle Police Department say several officers were injured during a clash with protesters outside the East Precinct in Capitol Hill on Saturday night, KIRO-TV is reporting. Around 7:30 p.m., police said demonstrators began moving barricades set up near 11th Avenue and Pine Street. Police said they made multiple requests for them to stop. Some of the demonstrators then began throwing rocks, bottles and “improvised explosives” at officers, police said. The Police Department tweeted a picture of what appears to be the remnants of a candle and a glass container in their original report about the “improvised explosives.” Police Chief Carmen Best was asked about the photo, but she did not clarify what types of “explosives” were thrown. Best said two of the injured officers were sent to the hospital. She did not give a further update on their conditions. Protesters at the scene told KIRO that there were some “instigators” in the crowd but stressed that many people in attendance are promoting peace. – The Associated Press contributed to this report.
  • More than 6.8 million people worldwide – including more than 1.9 million in the United States – have been infected with the new coronavirus, and the number of deaths from the outbreak continues to rise. While efforts to contain the COVID-19 outbreak continue, states have begun to shift their focus toward reopening their economies. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is tracking cases in the U.S. here. Live updates for Sunday, June 7, continue below: Next phase of reopening Massachusetts starts Monday Update 3:13 a.m. EDT June 7: Massachusetts Gov. Charlie Baker announced Saturday that Phase 2 of the state’s reopening process will begin Monday, Boston’s WFXT is reporting. “Thanks to your hard work and your sacrifices, we’re bringing the fight to the virus,” said Baker, thanking residents and business owners who have been anxiously awaiting a return to normalcy amid the COVID-19 pandemic. The Baker administration previously published details of Phase 2, which includes the return of youth sports practices, child care, day camps, warehouses and distribution centers, higher education courses required for graduating, lodging, routine medical exams and return of retail sales with restrictions. Key health metrics and advice from public health officials led the on-time start to Phase 2, according to Baker. The seven-day average of positive coronavirus tests since the start of May is down 82%, the three-day average of hospitalizations fell 55% over the same period, and hospitals operating in “surge” has been down 76%. “The goal here is as we move thing forward is so we can sustain it,” said Baker. There is a second part of Phase 2 that will include businesses offering nail care, massage therapy, tattoo and body art, and personal training services. There is no timetable for when the second portion of the phase will begin, according to the Baker administration. Each phase takes as little as three weeks, but if health data reveals a spike in key metrics, the state would put its reopening in reverse. Phase 3 could begin as early as June 29. US coronavirus cases top 1.9M, deaths near 110K Published 1:15 a.m. EDT June 7: The number of novel coronavirus cases in the United States continued to climb past 1.9 million early Sunday across all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, Guam and the U.S. Virgin Islands. According to a Johns Hopkins University tally, there are at least 1,920,061 confirmed U.S. cases of the virus, which have resulted in at least 109,802 deaths. The hardest-hit states remain New York, with 377,316 cases and 30,280 deaths, and New Jersey, with 163,893 cases and 12,106 deaths. Massachusetts, with 103,132 cases, has the third-highest number of deaths with 7,289, while California has the third-highest number of cases with 128,593. Only 14 states and territories have confirmed fewer than 5,000 cases each. Seven other states have now confirmed at least 50,000 novel coronavirus cases each, including: • Illinois: 126,890 cases, resulting in 5,864 deaths • Pennsylvania: 79,505 cases, resulting in 5,931 deaths • Texas: 74,470 cases, resulting in 1,833 deaths • Florida: 62,758 cases, resulting in 2,688 deaths • Michigan: 58,525 cases, resulting in 5,613 deaths • Maryland: 57,482 cases, resulting in 2,740 deaths • Georgia: 51,359 cases, resulting in 2,178 deaths Meanwhile, Virginia, Connecticut and Louisiana each has confirmed at least 42,000 cases; Ohio, Indiana and North Carolina each has confirmed at least 34,000 cases; Colorado, Minnesota, Tennessee, Arizona, Washington, Iowa, Wisconsin and Alabama each has confirmed at least 20,000 cases, followed by Mississippi with 17,039; Nebraska and Rhode Island each has confirmed at least 15,000 cases, followed by Missouri with 14,951, South Carolina with 13,453, Utah with 11,798 and Kentucky with 11,287; Kansas has confirmed at least 10,000 cases; Delaware, Nevada, the District of Columbia and Arkansas each has confirmed at least 9,000 cases; New Mexico has confirmed at least 8,000 cases, followed by Oklahoma with 7,059, South Dakota with 5,367 and New Hampshire with 5,019. Click here to see CNN’s state-by-state breakdown.
  • Eleven days after George Floyd’s death, outrage over police violence continues to fuel protests nationwide. Floyd, 46, died May 25 in police custody, and authorities have arrested four Minneapolis police officers in connection with his death. Former officer Derek Chauvin has been charged with second-degree murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter in Floyd’s death. Three other officers -- identified as Thomas Lane, J.A. Kueng and Tou Thao – face charges of aiding and abetting second-degree murder and aiding and abetting second-degree manslaughter. Floyd died on Memorial Day after he was detained for questioning regarding a possible forgery in progress. Video of his death caught by bystanders and shared on social media showed Chauvin holding his knee to Floyd’s neck for nearly nine minutes as Floyd pleaded for air. Live updates for Saturday, June 6 continue below: Washington’s ‘Black Lives Matter’ mural can be seen from space Update 11:51 p.m. EDT June 6: The large, yellow type “Black Lives Matter” mural that stretches along two blocks of a Washington D.C. street is visible from space, CNN reported. A satellite image of the mural was posted to social media by Planet Labs, a satellite observation network based in California. Washington Mayor Muriel Bowser commissioned the mural along 16th Street. Bowser also had the section named “Black Lives Matter Plaza” with appropriate street signs hoisted in place. Pittsburgh police chief kneels with protesters Update 11:25 p.m. EDT June 6: Pittsburgh Chief of Police Scott Schubert and several other officers joined hundreds of peaceful protesters Friday to march and kneel in a moment of silence at the Liberty Tunnel, WPXI-TV reported. The tunnel was closed for a time, blocked off with a line of state police troopers, as the crowd approached. Following the march and moment of silence, the group of hundreds turned around and returned to the parking lot. Protesters march for 9th day in Seattle Update 10:46 p.m. EDT June 6: Protesters marched for a 9th consecutive day in Seattle in a peaceful demonstration, holding to a shift in tone and mood that seemed to start Friday, KIRO-TV reported. The shift came after changes were made in police actions including officials with the Seattle Police Department saying they would stop using tear gas during protests. The ban on tear gas is for 30 days. Protesters said Friday they would keep the pressure on Seattle Mayor Jenny Durkan and police Chief Carmen Best to make changes. Golden Gate Bridge sidewalk opened for protesters Update 10:14 p.m. EDT June 6: The west sidewalk of the Golden Gate Bridge was opened Saturday for protesters during a Black Lives Matter protest. Thousands of people crowded the bridge tying up traffic along the iconic San Francisco bridge. Tow trucks held off car traffic in both directions, and police directed vehicles caught in the middle of the bridge to go around protesters who eventually moved off the roadway peacefully. The Associated Press contributed to this report.  White House wanted 10,000 active duty troops patrolling streets across the country Update 9:25 p.m. EDT June 6: President Donald Trump earlier this week wanted 10,000 active duty troops patrolling the streets of cities across the country, CBS News reported. Secretary of Defense Mark Esper, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Mark Milley and Attorney General William Barr advised against the plan. Esper did move about 1,600 active duty troops into Washington, D.C. to respond as needed. However the 5,000 National Guard troops did not need the help. The active duty troops started to leave Thursday, CNN reported. The National Guard has deployed 43,000 members in 34 states and Washington, D.C. Rapper, actor Chris ‘Ludacris’ Bridges joins Atlanta demonstration Update 7:45 p.m. EDT June 6: Rapper and actor Chris “Ludacris” Bridges joined protesters who took to the streets across Atlanta for a ninth day on Saturday, demanding racial and social justice. “There is change happening very slowly,' Bridges told WSB-TV. “We have the world’s ear right now. It’s going take a while. But anyone who signed up with us for this fight, be prepared to do it for more than 401 years and that’s all I have to say.” Bridges was at a demonstration outside Atlanta City Hall Broncos players, coaches join protests in Denver Update 7:03 p.m. EDT June 6: Players and coaches with the Denver Broncos marched with protesters at a demonstration Saturday. Players, who had on masks as part of coronavirus mitigation efforts, wore black shirts with the words 'Justice for George Floyd' on the front and 'If you ain't with us, you against us' on the back. “The time is always right to do what is right,” outside linebacker Von Miller said. “It’s up to us to keep this going.” Safety Kareem Jackson helped organize the team's appearance at the 10th day of demonstrations in downtown Denver. The Associated Press contributed to this report.  Atlanta lifts Saturday night curfew Update 5:44 p.m. EDT June 6: The city of Atlanta will not have a 8 p.m. curfew Saturday night. A spokesperson with the mayor’s office confirmed to WSB-TV that the citywide curfew has been lifted. Officials will monitor the situation before they make a decision about Sunday’s curfew. Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms ordered the first curfew last Saturday after peaceful protests turned into a night of vandalism and looting from downtown Atlanta to Buckhead. Bottoms had extended the nightly curfews throughout the week with an earlier one that went into effect at 8 p.m. Friday. Watch: George Floyd’s memorial service in NC Update 2:58 p.m. EDT June 6: Mourners gathered at Free Will Baptist Church in Raeford, North Carolina for a service for George Floyd. Watch it here: Romney recalls father’s participation in civil rights march Update 2:41 p.m. EDT June 6: Sen. Mitt Romney invoked the memory of his late father’s participation during a Civil Rights march in Detroit during the 1960s, The Washington Post reported. Romney, R-Utah, shared a photo on Twitter and Facebook of then-Michigan Gov. George Romney waking with protesters. “Force alone will not eliminate riots,” Mitt Romney wrote, quoting his father, who was governor of Michigan from 1969 to 1973. “We must eliminate the problems from which they stem.” Queens DA will not prosecute certain arrests Update 2:26 p.m. EDT June 6: Queens District Attorney Melinda Katz tweeted Saturday that she will not prosecute protest arrests based on curfew and social distancing violations. “We are proud to be a united front on this issue. Queens DA Katz is committed to reforms in the name of #SocialJustice and has declined to prosecute based on curfew and social distancing violations,” Katz said. A spokesperson for Katz told CNN that DA has refused to prosecute curfew-breakers 'from the start.” More than 2,500 protesters assemble in Philadelphia Update 2:18 p.m. EDT June 6: Approximately 2,500 protesters gathered outside the Philadelphia Museum of Art before heading to City Hall to rally against police brutality, WPVI reported. The demonstration began at noon, with protesters chanting, “No justice, no peace!” the television station reported. Thousands of protesters gather in DC, police say Update 1:48 p.m. EDT June 6: Police in Washington D.C. said there are about 6,000 protesters in the nation’s capital. According to a tweet by DC Police Traffic, a division of the Metropolitan Police Department, approximately 3,000 people have gathered at the Lincoln Memorial and another 3,000 have massed g near the White House. George Floyd’s high school to hold candlelight vigil Update 1:40 p.m. EDT June 6: A candlelight vigil honoring George Floyd will be held Monday at the Houston high school he attended, KTRK reported. National and local alumni were invited to the football field at Jack Yates High School for the 7:30 pm.. vigil, the television station reported. In a statement, Jack Yates officials said the alumni of the school “is deeply saddened and enraged over the senseless murder of our beloved Lion.” “We wish to express our support for the family and friends of Mr. Floyd. We along with millions of others across the world demand justice for this Injustice..” Social distancing will be enforced at the vigil, KTRK reported, and attendees will be required to wear masks and gloves. Mourners in NC gather for George Floyd memorial service Update 1:31 p.m. EDT June 6: The body of George Floyd was returned to his home state for a public viewing Saturday in Raeford. North Carolina, The Washington Post reported. Floyd’s body was inside a plush blue coffin at Free Will Baptist Church, the newspaper reported. Floyd, 46, was dressed in a tan suit and a brown tie and coffin was surrounded by floral arrangements, although his family had requested no flowers, the Post reported. As people posed for selfies in front of the church, an official told mourners to put away their phones before entering the church, the newspaper reported. “No phones out. No photos. No foul language,” he said. “This is a respectful service.” Buffalo officers who shoved elderly man charged with assault, released Update 11:31 a.m. EDT June 6: Prosecutors said two Buffalo, New York, police officers were charged with assault after video showed them shoving a 75-year-old protester, The Associated Press reported. Both men pleaded not guilty to a single count of second-degree assault via video conference and were released without bail, CNN reported. Earlier, police shut down roads in front of the City Court and gathered to support two fellow officers who were arraigned on charges that they shoved peace activist Martin Gugino on Thursday during a protest, the Buffalo News reported. Buffalo Police Commissioner Byron Lockwood suspended the officers without pay after the incident and ordered an internal investigation, the News reported. National Guard has deployed 43,000 members nationwide Update 11:55 a.m. EDT June 6: The National Guard said in a tweet that it has deployed 43,000 members in 34 states and the District of Columbia in response to protests in the aftermath of the death of George Floyd on May 25. That number represents an 1,800 increase of Guardsmen now engaged nationwide. Thousands attend Black Lives Matter protests in UK Update 9:38 a.m. EDT June 6: Thousands of protesters gathered at London’s Parliament Square on Saturday as part of a Black Lives Matter demonstration, CNN reported. The protest was one of several across the United Kingdom. There also was a Black Lives Matter protest in Manchester, according to the BBC. which estimated the crowd around Piccadilly Gardens to be at least 15,000 people and growing. Protesters, police clash in Portland Update 8:52 a.m. EDT June 6: Police in Portland, Oregon clashed with protesters late Friday and early Saturday after declaring a large gathering at the Justice Center a “civil disturbance and an unlawful assembly,' KATU reported. The declaration came after police said people in the crowd began throwing objects at officers standing guard at the Justice Center, the television station reported. A Portland Police Bureau spokesperson said several officers were injured but did not reveal the extent of their injuries. The Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office said it used gas and later tear gas to disperse the crowd, The Washington Post reported. Deputies said they arrested 20 adults and one juvenile, the newspaper reported. The crowd left the area by 4 a.m. local time. California gov: Chokehold has ‘no place’ in 21st-century policing Update 4:29 a.m. EDT June 6: A controversial chokehold has been removed from the state’s police training curriculum, California Gov. Gavin Newsom announced Friday. Known as a “carotid hold,” the maneuver can block blood flow to the brain. “We train techniques on strangleholds that put people’s lives at risk That has no place any longer in 21st century practices and policing,” Newsom said. Drew Brees’ reversal on kneeling fails to persuade Trump of NFL protest’s value Update 3:51 a.m. EDT June 6: New Orleans Saints quarterback Drew Brees took to Instagram Friday to try explaining one more time his new understanding of NFL protests to U.S. President Donald Trump. In the post, which Brees directed to Trump personally, he explained the American flag was never the target of the protest but rather systemic racism. Brees’ post came two days after he said he would “never agree with anybody disrespecting the flag,” for which he later issued a formal apology, calling his own comments “insensitive” and noting they “missed the mark on the issues we are facing right now as a country.' Trump was not impressed in the least by Brees’ Mea culpa. 'He should not have taken back his original stance on honoring our magnificent American Flag,' Trump tweeted. 'OLD GLORY is to be revered, cherished, and flown high...' In turn, Brees’ Instagram post argued “we can no longer use the flag to turn people away or distract them from the real issues that face our black communities.' California soldier removed from National Guard duty after violent Snapchat remarks Update 3:12 a.m. EDT June 6: A soldier who posted a Snapchat image that referenced killing “rioters” has been relieved of duty by the California National Guard. The soldier, who was removed Friday, had written: “Bout to put some rioters faces on those RIP shirts.” Meanwhile, an Ohio National Guardsman has been removed from duty in Washington after expressing “white-supremacist ideology on the Internet,” Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine said during a Friday news conference. Federal judge rules ‘threat to physical safety and free speech outweighs the threat to property’ Update 2:33 a.m. EDT June 6: A federal judge ruled late Friday that tear gas and rubber bullets are no longer options for the Denver Police Department confronting peaceful protesters. The threat to physical safety and free speech outweighs the threat to property,” U.S. District Judge R. Brooke Jackson wrote. Jackson’s ruling came after four protesters filed suit against the city of Denver, prompting the immediate moratorium on the use of “chemical weapons or projectiles” against protesters. “If a store’s windows must be broken to prevent a protester’s facial bones from being broken or eye being permanently damaged, that is more than a fair trade. If a building must be graffiti-ed to prevent the suppression of free speech, that is a fair trade,” Jackson wrote. The judge’s ruling also stipulates rubber bullets can never be aimed at the head, pelvis or back or shot indiscriminately into a crowd, and officers must wear body cameras that are recording at all times, The Washington Post reported. NYPD suspends 2 officers, transfers supervisor amid multiple protest complaints Published 2 a.m. EDT June 6: Two NYPD officers and one supervisor are facing stiff consequences following three high-profile incidents during recent New York City protests, Police Commissioner Dermot Shea confirmed late Friday. “Like all New Yorkers, we are acutely aware of the unique times we are in,” Shea said during a Friday news conference, noting two officers have been suspended without pay pending internal investigations and one supervisor has been transferred as a result of recent skirmishes captured on video. “While the investigations have to play out, based on the severity of what we saw, it is appropriate and necessary to assure the public that there will be transparency during the disciplinary process,” Shea said. One officer was caught on video pushing a woman to the ground in Brooklyn on May 29, and a supervisor present during the altercation has been transferred. The second suspended officer can be seen in a separate video pulling down a protester’s face mask and pepper spraying him. All three cases have been referred to the department advocate for disciplinary action, Shea said.
  • More than 6.7 million people worldwide -- including nearly 1.9 million in the United States – have been infected with the new coronavirus, and the number of deaths from the outbreak continues to rise. While efforts to contain the COVID-19 outbreak continue, states have begun to shift their focus toward reopening their economies. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is tracking cases in the U.S. here. Live updates for Saturday, June 6, continue below:  North Carolina sees new single-day record 1,370 new COVID-19 cases Update 5:01 p.m. EDT June 6: The North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services on Saturday reported the highest daily increase in cases, with 1,370, WSOC-TV reported. This is the second day in a row that the state has broken its record for a single-day case increase. The previous highest one-day increase was 1,289 set just the day before. The additional 1,370 new COVID-19 cases bring the state’s total to 34,625. There have been 992 deaths from the coronavirus in North Carolina. Cuomo plans to speed up reopening of houses of worship Update 1:13 p.m. EDT June 6: New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said he plans to speed up the reopening of churches, mosques and temples. The houses of worship will be allowed to reopen at 25% occupancy as New York state moves to phase two, Cuomo said at his daily news conference. “We are doing so well on the metrics,” Cuomo said, but urged residents to “stay smart.” UK reports 204 new deaths Update 9:46 a.m. EDT June 6: The United Kingdom’s Department of Health reported an additional 204 coronavirus deaths, boosting the country’s total death toll to 40,465. The BBC reported that 284,868 people have now tested positive for the virus in the UK, according to official figures. Brazil tops 35,000 deaths Update 8:28 a.m. EDT June 6: Brazil’s health ministry reported 1,005 more deaths Friday, pushing the country’s total to more than 35,000. Brazil is third worldwide in reported deaths behind the United States and the United Kingdom. The ministry also reported 30,830 new coronavirus cases in the past 24 hour, putting the nationwide total to 645,771 cases. Global deaths top 395K, total cases approach 6.8M Update 7:45 a.m. EDT June 6: The global death toll attributed to the novel coronavirus reached 395,331 early Saturday, according to a Johns Hopkins University tally. In the four months since the virus was first identified in Wuhan, China, it has infected at least 6,759,210 people worldwide. Meanwhile, 17 nations now have total infection counts higher than China’s 84,177. The 10 nations with the highest number of infections recorded to date are as follows: • The United States has reported 1,897,838 cases, resulting in 109,143 deaths. • Brazil has recorded 614,941 cases, resulting in 34,021 deaths. • Russia has confirmed 458,102 cases, resulting in 5,717 deaths. • The United Kingdom has reported 284,735 cases, resulting in 40,344 deaths. • Spain has confirmed 240,978 cases, resulting in 27,134 deaths. • India has reported 237,566 cases, resulting in 6,650 deaths. • Italy has reported 234,531 cases, resulting in 33,774 deaths. • France has confirmed 190,180 cases, resulting in 29,114 deaths. • Peru has reported 187,400 cases, resulting in 5,162 deaths. • Germany has reported 185,416 cases, resulting in 8,666 deaths. Some Arizona ICUs nearing capacity amid coronavirus hospitalization surge Update 7:20 a.m. EDT June 6: One of the largest health-care systems in the United States is nearing capacity in its Arizona intensive care units as coronavirus hospitalizations spike. Banner Health Chief Clinical Officer Marjorie Bessel discussed the uptick as a “concern” during a Friday news conference. As of June 4, there was 1,234 hospitalizations, and about half of those patients are hospitalized in Banner Health facilities, Bessel confirmed. Of those hospitalizations, 116 patients are were on ventilators as of June 4. Bessel also said the company has been “load balancing” between Banner hospitals, meaning they are transferring patients and resources between facilities to meet as needed to serve the individual communities without overtaxing any one facility. Should the trend continue, Bessel said, Banner will need to exercise surge planning and “flex” up to 125% bed capacity.  Officials are concerned about the steep incline of patients on ventilators, with 116 patients on ventilators in Banner hospitals as of June 4. According to a Johns Hopkins University tally, Arizona has confirmed a total of 24,439 novel coronavirus infections, resulting in 1,015 deaths. Nearly half of US seeing uptick in coronavirus transmissions, report Update 6:12 a.m. EDT June 6: The rate of novel coronavirus infections has slowed in the United States since reaching its peak in mid-May, but cases continue to mount nationwide and several locales appear particularly hard hit. According to data compiled by The Washington Post, 23 states, as well as the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico, have seen their 7-day average of coronavirus cases increase compared with the prior week. The majority of those regions have recorded an increase of at least 10%.  Read more here. US coronavirus cases near 1.9M, deaths top 109K Published 12:42 a.m. EDT June 6: The number of novel coronavirus cases in the United States continued to climb toward 1.9 million early Saturday across all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, Guam and the U.S. Virgin Islands. According to a Johns Hopkins University tally, there are at least 1,897,838 confirmed U.S. cases of the virus, which have resulted in at least 109,143 deaths.  The hardest-hit states remain New York with 376,208 cases and 30,236 deaths and New Jersey with 163,336 cases and 12,049 deaths. Massachusetts, with 102,557 cases, has the third-highest number of deaths with 7,235, while Illinois has the third-highest number of cases with 125,915. Only 15 states and territories have confirmed fewer than 5,000 cases each. Seven other states have now confirmed at least 50,000 novel coronavirus cases each, including: • California: 125,738 cases, resulting in 4,529 deaths • Pennsylvania: 78,815 cases, resulting in 5,898 deaths • Texas: 72,548 cases, resulting in 1,812 deaths • Florida: 61,488 cases, resulting in 2,660 deaths • Michigan: 58,525 cases, resulting in 5,613 deaths • Maryland: 56,770 cases, resulting in 2,702 deaths • Georgia: 50,621 cases, resulting in 2,174 deaths Meanwhile, Virginia, Connecticut and Louisiana each has confirmed at least 41,000 cases; Ohio, Indiana and North Carolina each has confirmed at least 33,000 cases; Colorado, Minnesota, Tennessee, Arizona, Washington, Iowa and Wisconsin each has confirmed at least 20,000 cases, followed by Alabama with 19,387 and Mississippi with 16,769; Rhode Island and Nebraska each has confirmed at least 15,000 cases, followed by Missouri with 14,572, South Carolina with 13,453 and Utah with 11,252; Kentucky and Kansas each has confirmed at least 10,000 cases; Delaware, Nevada and the District of Columbia each has confirmed at least 9,000 cases; New Mexico and Arkansas each has confirmed at least 8,000 cases, followed by Oklahoma with 7,007 and South Dakota with 5,277.  Click here to see CNN’s state-by-state breakdown.

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