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  • Clay County Sheriff’s Office, Nassau County Board of County Commissioners, and the City of Jacksonville has been given over six million dollars to hire new full-time law enforcement officers. The funds come from the Justice Department’s Community Oriented Policing Services Hiring Program. 14 total law enforcement agencies were awarded money in the Middle District of Florida. “Community policing is an effective tool in reducing crime in our neighborhoods, building relationships of mutual trust and accountability, and implementing successful prevention and intervention strategies,” said U.S. Attorney Maria Chapa Lopez. “We are eager to continue working with our partner agencies, our community, and our citizens in this collective problem solving strategy to improve public safety.” Clay County Sheriff’s Department was awarded $500,000 to hire four new officers. Nassau County Board of County Commissioners was also awarded $500,000 to hire four new officers. The City of Jacksonville was awarded the most money, being given $5,000,000 to hire 40 new officers.
  • More than 6.4 million people worldwide – including more than 1.8 million in the United States – have been infected with the new coronavirus, and the number of deaths from the outbreak continues to rise. While efforts to contain the COVID-19 outbreak continue, states have begun to shift their focus toward reopening their economies. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is tracking cases in the U.S. here. Live updates for Wednesday, June 3, continue below: Florida to begin second phase of reopening Friday Update 2:30 p.m. EDT June 3: Gov. Ron DeSantis of Florida announced Wednesday that the second phase of reopening businesses shuttered statewide due to the coronavirus pandemic will begin Friday, according to WFTV. DeSantis said 64 of Florida’s 67 counties will move into the new phase. The counties not moving into the phase are Palm Beach County, Miami-Dade County and Broward County, according to WFTV. The second phase of reopening in Florida will allow bars, nightclubs, bowling alleys and movie theaters to reopen at 50% capacity, WFTV reported. >> Read more on WFTV.com 652 new cases of COVID-19 reported in New Jersey Update 1:50 p.m. EDT June 3: Gov. Phil Murphy of New Jersey said Wednesday that 652 new coronavirus infections have been reported, raising the total number of COVID-19 cases in the state to 162,068. On social media, the governor encouraged people to continue social distancing. “We cannot lose sight of what’s important -- remaining vigilant and keeping up with our social distancing,” Murphy said. “We’re still at or near the top of the list in terms of patients in our hospitals and the number of residents we are losing to (COVID-19).” Officials also reported 112 more deaths associated with the coronavirus pandemic. As of Tuesday, 11,880 people have died statewide of COVID-19. New Jersey to allow restaurants, bars to reopen for outdoor dining Update 1:20 p.m. EDT June 3: Gov. Phil Murphy of New Jersey said Wednesday that he plans to sign an executive order to allow for in-person, outdoor dining at restaurants and bars statewide beginning June 15. The governor said businesses will still need to allow for social distancing measures to continue at the businesses. Last coronavirus patients leave Boston Hope field hospital Update 1:05 p.m. EDT June 3: The last two patients released from field hospital Boston Hope Medical Center departed the makeshift facility for recovering coronavirus patients to applause and celebration Tuesday, WFXT reported. Joseph Murphy, 68, pumped his fists in victory as staff wheeled him outside following a 36-day stay, according to WFXT. Family members watched by FaceTime as staff members sang along to Murphy’s favorite songs from Frank Sinatra and Neil Diamond with tears in their eyes, the news station reported. The very last patient to leave, Oger Julien, 78, of Malden, waved his arms, thankful for his health and his medical team. >> Read more on Boston25News.com 1,871 new coronavirus infections reported in the UK Update 1 p.m. EDT June 3: Officials in the United Kingdom reported 1,871 new coronavirus infections Wednesday, raising the country’s total number of infections to 279,856. Officials said that as of 5 p.m. local time Tuesday, the most recent date for which data was available, 39,728 people had died nationwide of COVID-19. 49 new fatal COVID-19 cases reported in New York Update 12:05 p.m. EDT June 3: Gov. Andrew Cuomo of New York said Wednesday that 49 more people have died of COVID-19 in the state, the lowest daily death toll reported from the virus since the beginning of the pandemic. The number fell below the 58 new fatal cases reported one day earlier and below the 54 deaths reported on Monday. Some Pennsylvania schools to resume in-person classes in July, officials say Update 11:40 a.m. EDT June 3: Officials with the Pennsylvania Department of Education announced Wednesday that some elementary and secondary schools in the state will be allowed to resume in-person classes and activities July 1. Officials said schools in parts of the state that are under the yellow or green phases of reopening will be allowed to resume on-campus activities. Post-secondary institutions and adult basic education programs will be allowed to resume in-person classes as soon as Friday. “We need to direct our energy to focus on how to resume instruction in the 2020-21 school year,' state Education Secretary Pedro Rivera said Wednesday in a statement. 'We fully expect students to return to classrooms in some capacity and are confident that schools will use this guidance to build a framework that best meets the unique needs of their students and communities.” 130 new cases of COVID-19 reported in DC Update 11:15 a.m. EDT June 3: Health officials in Washington D.C. said Wednesday that 130 new coronavirus infections have been reported in the area, raising the total number of cases in the area to 9,016. Officials also announced that three more people between the ages of 67 and 91 had died of COVID-19 in Washington D.C., bringing the total number of deaths in the District to 473. University of Southern California to resume in-person classes in August Update 10:40 a.m. EDT June 3: University of Southern California President Carol Folt said Tuesday that officials expect to resume classes on campus for the fall semester beginning in August. “While we still have many details to work out, we are planning for an in-person fall semester for students beginning on August 17, 2020, a week earlier than scheduled,” Folt said in a letter posted on the school’s website. 'All classes, including final exams, will end by Thanksgiving. By ending the semester before Thanksgiving, we are aiming to minimize the spread of the virus, particularly as the flu season commences.' To accommodate for the changes in the school schedule, Folt said the regular fall break has been cancelled for the 2020-2021 school year. “Please understand that these plans remain contingent on several factors, including the continued spread of COVID-19, and the health orders from state and local authorities,” Folt said. “So, things could change, but we are excited to move forward and to have you back.” Wall Street’s rally rolls into Day 4 on reopening hopes Update 10 a.m. EDT June 3: Stocks pushed higher in early trading Wednesday on Wall Street as the stock market’s rally carried into a fourth day. The S&P 500 added 0.7% to gains made in earlier days on optimism that lifting lockdowns around the world will allow the economy to recover from its current hole. Treasury yields also rose in a sign of improved confidence after a report suggested U.S. job losses weren’t as horrific last month as economists expected. “The theme of reopening optimism has its stronghold on markets going into the midweek,” said Jingyi Pan, market strategist for IG. The Dow Jones Industrial Average was up 191 points, or 0.7%, at 25,933, as of 9:37 a.m. Eastern time, and the Nasdaq composite was up 0.3%. NC governor: ‘Unfortunate’ RNC didn’t agree to ‘make changes to keep people safe’ from COVID-19 Update 9:55 a.m. EDT June 3: Gov. Roy Cooper of North Carolina said Tuesday that officials in the state have been committed to ensuring that people are safe during the Republican National Convention, planned for August, and lamented that party officials wouldn’t agree to “make changes to keep people safe.” “We have been committed to a safe (Republican National Committee) convention in North Carolina and it’s unfortunate they never agreed to scale down and make changes to keep people safe,” he said Tuesday in a tweet. “Protecting public health and safety during this pandemic is a priority.” Cooper’s comments came after President Donald Trump announced that he’s seeking another state to host this year’s convention, saying that North Carolina officials couldn’t guarantee that the event could be held in Charlotte as planned without restrictions due to the novel coronavirus outbreak. City officials later said in a statement obtained by WSOC-TV that they had yet to receive notification from the RNC about plans to move the convention. City officials said the RNC is under contract to hold the convention in Charlotte and that the city attorney would be in contact with the RNC’s attorneys, WSOC-TV reported. >> Read more on WSOCTV.com First human trials begin for COVID-19 antibody therapy Update 9:15 a.m. EDT June 3: Officials with Eli Lilly and Company announced Monday that the first human trials of the pharmaceutical company’s COVID-19 antibody therapy drug have begun. “Lilly scientists delivered the first doses of our potential COVID-19 antibody treatment, flown to hospitals in several U.S. cities to start the world’s first human study of this kind of therapy to fight COVID infections,” company officials said on Twitter. Officials said the of its experimental drug were administered to patients in Atlanta, New York and Los Angeles. >> Read more on WSBTV.com Global deaths near 381K, total cases top 6.4M Update 7:58 a.m. EDT June 3: The global death toll attributed to the novel coronavirus reached 380,764 early Tuesday, according to a Johns Hopkins University tally. In the four months since the virus was first identified in Wuhan, China, it has infected at least 6,404,872 people worldwide. Meanwhile, 16 nations now have total infection counts higher than China’s 84,159. The 10 nations with the highest number of infections recorded to date are as follows: • The United States has reported 1,831,821 cases, resulting in 106,181 deaths. • Brazil has recorded 555,383 cases, resulting in 31,199 deaths. • Russia has confirmed 431,715 cases, resulting in 5,208 deaths. • The United Kingdom has reported 279,393 cases, resulting in 39,452 deaths. • Spain has confirmed 239,932 cases, resulting in 27,127 deaths. • Italy has reported 233,515 cases, resulting in 33,530 deaths. • India has reported 208,479 cases, resulting in 5,834 deaths. • France has confirmed 188,450 cases, resulting in 28,943 deaths. • Germany has reported 184,097 cases, resulting in 8,576 deaths. • Peru has reported 170,039 cases, resulting in 4,634 deaths. South Korea will start importing remdesivir to help treat COVID-19 patients Update 7:42 a.m. EDT June 3: South Korea’s Ministry of Food and Drug Safety announced Wednesday it has approved imports of the antivirus drug remdesivir to address the nation’s novel coronavirus infections. In its announcement the ministry pointed to success with the drug in shortening the treatment period for severe COVID-19 patients in the United States, Japan and the United Kingdom throughout the pandemic. The ministry, alongside its Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, will now negotiate to import the drug via Gilead Science Korea. UK ethnic minorities up to 50% more likely to die from COVID-19 than white people, report Update 7:26 a.m. EDT June 3: A government review has concluded people from the United Kingdom’s ethnic minority communities are as much as 50% more likely to die from contracting the novel coronavirus than their white peers. Public Health England’s study found that people of Bangladeshi heritage who tested positive for the virus were around twice as likely to die as their white British peers, CNN reported. Other minority communities such as people of Chinese, Indian, Pakistani and Caribbean descent also had a 10% to 50% higher risk of death from COVID-19. Meanwhile, the rate of infection per 100,000 patients was more than double for women in black ethnic groups than for white women and nearly triple for men in those same groups, the network reported. USC resuming in-person classes in August Update 7:18 a.m. EDT June 3: The University of Southern California will resume in-person classes when the fall semester begins in August, president Carol L. Folt confirmed Tuesday. According to Folt’s message to students, classes will start one week earlier than originally planned and conclude by Thanksgiving. Folt also said the majority of in-person classes will also be offered online, giving faculty and students the option of not returning to campus. In addition, masks and physical distancing will be mandatory at all times, while dorms and dining halls “will be modified to reduce density and contact,” Folt wrote. Oklahoma State linebacker tests positive for COVID-19 after attending protest Update 7:04 a.m. EDT June 3: Oklahoma State linebacker Amen Ogbongbemiga said in a Tuesday tweet that he has tested positive for the novel coronavirus after attending a protest. “After attending a protest in Tulsa AND being well protective of myself, I have tested positive for COVID-19,” Ogbongbemiga tweeted. “Please, if you are going to protest, take care of yourself and stay safe.” India confirms COVID-19 cases top 200K Update 6:57 a.m. EDT June 3: Today is the day tourism returns to Italy, at least partially. As the country reopens to European visitors only, Italian tourism officials can only wait and see how much wanderlust remains among the traveling public following the extended novel coronavirus pandemic. According to The Washington Post, Italy hosted 63 million overseas visitors last year, but the country’s minister for culture and tourism, Dario Franceschini, has said that he does not expect the industry to recover fully until 2023. Major attractions such as the Colosseum and the Leaning Tower of Pisa have already reopened for domestic tourists, the Post reported. Italy welcomes return of European tourists Wednesday Update 6:38 a.m. EDT June 3: With 8,909 new novel coronavirus cases confirmed during the past 24 hours, India became the seventh nation worldwide to surpass 200,000 total infections. According to a Johns Hopkins University tally, India has confirmed a total of 208,404 cases, resulting in 5,833 deaths. The other six nations topping the 200,000 mark to date include: • United States: 1,831,821 • Brazil: 555,383 • Russia: 431,715 • United Kingdom: 279,392 • Spain: 239,932 • Italy: 233,515 US coronavirus cases climb past 1.8M, deaths top 106K Update 12:50 a.m. EDT June 3: The number of novel coronavirus cases in the United States continued to climb past 1.8 million early Wednesday across all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, Guam and the U.S. Virgin Islands. According to a Johns Hopkins University tally, there are at least 1,831,821 confirmed U.S. cases of the virus, which have resulted in at least 106,181 deaths.  The hardest-hit states remain New York with 373,040 cases and 29,968 deaths and New Jersey with 161,545 cases and 11,771 deaths. Massachusetts, with 101,163 cases, has the third-highest number of deaths with 7,085, while Illinois has the third-highest number of cases with 122,848. Only 15 states and territories have confirmed fewer than 5,000 cases each. Six other states have now confirmed at least 54,000 novel coronavirus cases each, including: • California: 117,215 cases, resulting in 4,305 deaths • Pennsylvania: 77,225 cases, resulting in 5,667 deaths • Texas: 67,310 cases, resulting in 1,716 deaths • Michigan: 57,731 cases, resulting in 5,553 deaths • Florida: 57,447 cases, resulting in 2,530 deaths • Maryland: 54,175 cases, resulting in 2,597 deaths Meanwhile, Georgia, Virginia, Connecticut and Louisiana each has confirmed at least 40,000 cases; Ohio, Indiana and North Carolina each has confirmed at least 30,000 cases; Colorado, Minnesota, Tennessee, Washington, Arizona and Iowa each has confirmed at least 20,000 cases; Alabama and Wisconsin each has confirmed at least 18,000 cases, followed by Mississippi with 16,041 and Rhode Island with 15,112; Nebraska and Missouri each has confirmed at least 14,000 cases, followed by South Carolina with 12,415; Utah and Kentucky each has confirmed at least 10,000 cases; Kansas and Delaware each has confirmed at least 9,000 cases; the District of Columbia, Nevada and New Mexico each has confirmed at least 8,000 cases; Arkansas, Oklahoma and South Dakota each has confirmed at least 5,000 cases Click here to see CNN’s state-by-state breakdown. The Associated Press contributed to this report.
  • Faith leaders from across Jacksonville came together at the Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office Headquarters off Bay Street to speak out against police brutality and the killings of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor and Ahmaud Arbery.  The key message is that they want more accountability from the City of Jacksonville. They wanted to see the release of all body camera footage from officer-involved shootings, have a public declaration from the Sheriff’s Office that demands officers to refrain from excessive use of force, and for a new oversight board that has investigative and subpoena powers to deal with allegations of police misconduct. Speakers included Rev. RL Gundy, Pastor Robert LeCount, Parvez Ahmed, Rev. Susan Rogers, Rabbi Jonathan Lubliner, and Rev. Phillip Baber. After each speaker had a turn to talk about injustices in the community and how city leaders could do better, everyone knelt for eight minutes and 46 seconds. Those eight minutes and 46 seconds were the same amount of time a now former Minneapolis officer was seen on camera kneeling Floyd’s neck before he died. That former officer is now facing a charge of second-degree murder. The other three officers involved in Floyd’s death are facing aiding and abetting in second-degree murder.
  • Protests remained mostly peaceful Tuesday night as demonstrators took to streets across the country to protest police brutality in the aftermath of the death of George Floyd, an unarmed black man who died while in police custody in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Floyd, 46, died after he was detained for questioning regarding a possible forgery in progress. Video of his death caught by bystanders showed a Minneapolis police officer, identified as Derek Chauvin, holding his knee to Floyd’s neck for more than five minutes as Floyd pleaded for air, sparking outrage. As of Wednesday, at least 40 cities across 16 states have imposed curfews. Live updates for Wednesday, June 3 continue below:  George Floyd’s family calls charging decisions against officers ‘bittersweet’ Update 2:40 p.m. EDT June 3: The family of George Floyd called the decision Wednesday to charge three more officers in the 46-year-old’s death and to upgrade the charge against Officer Derek Chauvin to second-degree murder “bittersweet.” “We are deeply gratified that (Minnesota Attorney General Keith Ellison) took decision action, arresting (and) charging ALL the officers involved in (George Floyd’s) death (and) upgrading the charge against Derek Chauvin to felony second-degree murder,” Floyd’s family said in a statement shared by Crump. Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., confirmed on Twitter that Ellison had decided to upgrade the charge against Chauvin from third-degree murder and to charge the other three officers seen in video captured by passersby standing by or helping to pin Floyd to the ground last week. Chauvin and the other three officers who were part of the police response, identified as Thomas Lane, J.A. Kueng and Tou Thao, were fired last week from the Minneapolis Police Department. Prosecutor upgrading charge against Chauvin, charging 3 other officer involved in Floyd’s death Update 2:15 p.m. EDT June 3: Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., said Wednesday that a murder charge leveled against former Minneapolis police Officer Derek Chauvin is being upgraded to second-degree murder. The senator also said three other officers involved in Floyd’s death, Thomas Lane, J.A. Kueng and Tou Thao, will also be charged. Earlier Wednesday, attorney Ben Crump, who is representing Floyd’s family, told protesters gathered in Minneapolis that he expected the officers who had yet to be charged in the death of the 46-year-old to face charges as accomplices to murder. Crump said the three other officers “are accomplices because (of) their failure to act when they say he (didn’t) have a pulse.” 14,000 complaints made about Seattle police during protests Update 1:30 p.m. EDT June 3: Video of a young girl who appeared to have been pepper-sprayed by Seattle police during a protest over the weekend went viral -- and generated at least 11,000 complaints to the city’s Office of Police Accountability, according to KIRO-TV. OPA Director Andrew Myerberg said Tuesday that his office had received 14,000 complaints about 13 incidents over four days of protests following the death of George Floyd at the hands of Minneapolis police. “People are angry, people want answers now, and we need to do our best to move forward expeditiously with these cases while still being thorough,” Myerberg said, according to KIRO-TV. Myerberg said he wants his civilian-led investigations into the most pressing cases done in 45 to 60 days, instead of the usual six months, KIRO-TV reported. “We are going to get to the bottom of all these cases,” he said. >> Read more on KIRO7.com Photo of boy praying for police during unrest goes viral Update 1:15 p.m. EDT June 3: A photo taken of a 7-year-old boy praying for police in Tulsa, Oklahoma, gone viral with more than 10,500 shares as of Wednesday morning, KOKI-TV reported. The photo shows Trey Elliott with his hand on the shoulder of a Tulsa police officer. The boy’s mother, Brittany Elliot, and her husband told KOKI-TV that they’ve spoken to Trey about protests going on nationwide. Britney Elliott told the news station that her son wanted to pray for officers as some demonstrators began to vandalize Tulsa. >> Read more on Fox23.com Floyd family attorney says he expects 3 officers to be charged as accomplices Update 1 p.m. EDT June 3: Attorney Ben Crump, who is representing the family of George Floyd, told protesters gathered Wednesday in Minneapolis that he expects the officers who have yet to be charged in the death of the 46-year-old to face charges as accomplices to murder. Crump said former Minneapolis police officers Thomas Lane, J.A. Kueng and Tou Thao “are accomplices because (of) their failure to act when they say he (didn’t) have a pulse.” A criminal complaint filed last week against former Officer Derek Chauvin showed that Lane asked about whether they should move Floyd onto his side after he appeared to stop breathing and speaking. Prosecutors said Kueng checked Floyd’s pulse and said that he couldn’t find one, but officers remained on top of Floyd for another two minutes. “To us, that is intent,” Crump said. “That’s why the family is calling for first-degree murder charges against Officer Chauvin for having his knee in (Floyd’s) neck.” ACLU sues law enforcement over attacks on journalists covering protests Update 12:50 p.m. EDT June 3: Officials with the American Civil Liberties Union of Minnesota filed a class action lawsuit Wednesday on behalf of journalists who said they were targeted by police as protests over the killing of George Floyd erupted nationwide. The lawsuit alleges a “pattern and practice of conduct by law enforcement,” which the organization says, “tramples on the Constitution.” “Law enforcement is using violence and threats to deter the media from vigorously reporting on demonstrations and the conduct of police in public places,” ACLU-MN Legal Director Teresa Nelson said in a statement. “We depend on a free press to hold the police and government accountable for its actions, especially at a time like this when police have brutally murdered one of our community members, and we must ensure that justice is done. Our community, especially people of color, already have a hard time trusting police and government. Targeting journalists erodes that public trust even further.” The lawsuit’s lead plaintiff is Jared Goyette, a freelance journalist who says he was shot in the face by a rubber bullet fired by police. The suit outlines the number of journalists who have been arrested or injured by police since the demonstrations began last week. Named in the suit were the City of Minneapolis, police Chief Medaria Arradondo, police union head Lt. Bob Kroll, Minnesota Department of Public Safety Commissioner John Harrington and Minnesota State Patrol Col. Matthew Langer. Decision on more charges in Floyd case expected to be announced Wednesday, report says Update 11:30 a.m. EDT June 3: Unidentified law enforcement officials told CNN on Wednesday that authorities have come to a decision on additional charges against the officers involved in George Floyd’s death. An official told CNN that Minnesota Attorney General Keith Ellison “will be making a significant announcement in the case early this afternoon.” Last week, officials charged former Minneapolis police Officer Derek Chauvin with third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter in Floyd’s death. Video footage caught by passersby showed him pressing his knee to Floyd’s neck for nearly nine minutes May 25 as Floyd begged for air. Three other officers who were part of the police response, Thomas Lane, J.A. Kueng and Tou Thao, have not been charged in Floyd’s death. All four officers were fired last week from the police force. Officers involved in George Floyd’s death should be ‘held accountable for his murder,’ Esper says Update 11:10 a.m. EDT June 3: Defense Secretary Mark Esper on Wednesday said that the officers involved in the death of George Floyd should be “held accountable for his murder.” “Let me say upfront, the killing of George Floyd by a Minneapolis policeman is a horrible crime,' Esper said at a news conference, according to CNN. “The officers on the scene that day should be held accountable for his murder. It is a tragedy that we have seen repeat itself too many times.” Authorities have arrested and charged one of the four officers involved in the incident that led to Floyd’s death. Video footage shot by passersby showed then-Officer Derek Chauvin pressing his knee to Floyd’s neck for nine minutes May 25. He has been charged with third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter. Former officers Thomas Lane, J.A. Kueng and Tou Thao, who have all been fired along with Chuavin from the Minneapolis Police Department, have not been charged in Floyd’s death. Esper said Wednesday that while he tries to keep his department apolitical, he felt compelled to denounce the killing of Floyd. “What happened to George Floyd happens way too often in this country and most times we don’t speak about these matters as a department, but as events have unfolded over the past few days it became very clear that this was becoming a very combustible national issue,” he said. Defense Secretary Mark Esper: ‘I do not support invoking the Insurrection Act’ Update 10:25 a.m. EDT June 3: Defense Secretary Mark Esper said Wednesday that he does not support invoking the Insurrection Act amid nationwide protests due to the killing of George Floyd. “The option to use active-duty forces in a law enforcement role should only be used as a matter of last resort and only in the most urgent and dire of situations. We are not in one of those situations now,” Esper said during a news conference. President Donald Trump said Monday that he plans to invoke the 1807 federal law, allowing him to deploy active-duty U.S. troops to respond to the unrest nationwide. Trump denies he was taken to bunker during protests Friday in Washington Update 10:15 a.m. EDT June 3: President Donald Trump on Wednesday denied reports that he was taken to the White House bunker on Friday as hundreds of protesters gathered outside the executive mansion. “It was a false report,” he said during an interview with Fox News Radio. The president said he did go down “for a tiny little short period of time” but he said that happened during the day and “was for an inspection.” “I’ve gone down two or three times, all for inspection,” Trump told Fox News Radio. “You go there and someday you may need it.” The New York Times and several other news outlets reported that Secret Service agents rushed Trump to the underground bunker Friday as protests grew outside the White House. More than 200 arrested in Houston protests Update 10:05 a.m. EDT June 3: Houston police said early Wednesday that more than 200 people had been arrested during protests of police brutality in the wake of George Floyd’s death, though authorities said the number was relatively low. Police said in a statement posted on Twitter that the arrests were on suspicion of throwing rocks and bottles at officers and other crimes. Many people were also arrested for refusing to clear the streets as authorities tried to keep the peace. Authorities noted that the number of arrests was “extremely low ... considering the thousands of people in our community who marched and demonstrated peacefully.” Police said early Wednesday that they had received no significant reports of property damage or injuries. Doughnut shop set on fire during protest in Brockton, Massachusetts Update 9:30 a.m. EDT June 3: Demonstrators took to the streets nationwide Tuesday for mostly peaceful protests against police brutality in the wake of George Floyd’s death, but things took a turn in Brockton, Massachusetts, where protests turned violent, according to WFXT. The news station reported that protesters began to throw objects Tuesday evening and lit flares at police officers as they stood outside the Brockton police station on Commercial Street. Later, they set a Dunkin Donuts restaurant on fire, WFXT reported. Police later deployed tear gas in an effort to quell the crowd, according to WFXT. >> Read more on Boston25News.com Atlanta police blindsided by charges against officers who used Taser on students Update 8:55 a.m. EDT June 3: In an email obtained by WSB-TV, Atlanta police Chief Ericka Shields indicated that she was blindsided by the charges filed this week against two police officers seen on video using a Taser gun on two students as they sat in their car during protests over the weekend. Shields said she spent hours reviewing video of the situation, which happened Saturday night, and realized conflicting instructions to the students created chaos and escalated a low-level encounter, WSB-TV reported. She called the cops involved “good people and good cops” who made “multiple mistakes in a heated moment.” Fulton County District Attorney Paul Howard filed excessive force charges Tuesday against the six officers involved in the situation, according to WSB-TV. >> Read more on WSBTV.com Seattle protesters arm themselves with umbrellas to combat crowd-control sprays Update 5:50 a.m. EDT June 3: Dozens of protesters on the front lines of a Tuesday night standoff with police in Seattle’s Capitol Hill neighborhood wielded umbrellas to shield themselves from crowd-control sprays such as pepper spray, CNN reported. Seattle remains under a nightly 10 p.m. curfew, which Mayor Jenny Durkan extended through Saturday. NYC police block Manhattan side of Brooklyn Bridge during standoff with protesters Update 5:38 a.m. EDT June 3: Hundreds of protesters attempting to cross the Brooklyn Bridge on foot en route to Manhattan were met by a police blockade Tuesday night, prompting an hours-long standoff that ended peacefully, The Washington Post reported. The skirmish ended around 10:30 p.m. when police vans advanced toward the crowd, which retreated to begin the return walk to Brooklyn. National Guard mobilizes briefly in DC’s Lafayette Square, pepper sprays protesters Update 5:27 a.m. EDT June 3: The Washington D.C. National Guard mobilized briefly early Wednesday morning to quell hundreds of protesters still demonstrating in Lafayette Park nearly six hours after the city’s 7 p.m. curfew took effect, CNN reported. About 250 protesters gathered near a fence erected earlier this week following skirmishes in the park, and some tossed fireworks and other projectiles at police gathered on the other side of makeshift barricade, the network reported. Guardsmen then fired pepper spray at the crowd and what appeared to be flash bangs to encourage dispersal.  “Now what you’re seeing is the response from the DC National Guard,” CNN Correspondent Alex Marquardt reported from the scene, adding, “I’m not seeing any park police, this is all military police.” Los Angeles police arrest protesters outside mayor's residence Update 5:09 a.m. EDT June 3: Protests in Los Angeles concluded late Tuesday with a handful of straggling demonstrators arrested outside the official residence of Mayor Eric Garcetti. At one point earlier Tuesday night, the crowd outside the home swelled to several hundred protesters, many of whom chanted “defund the police” and called for the firing of Los Angeles Police Chief Michel R. Moore, The Washington Post reported. Earlier in the day Garcetti joined protesters downtown and knelt with them in solidarity. He was not home during Tuesday’s demonstration. Charlotte police corner protesters, livestream video shows Update 4:38 a.m. EDT June 3: Police in Charlotte trapped dozens of peaceful demonstrators next to a parking structure late Tuesday, pummeling them with tear gas, pepper balls and flash bangs. Video of the clash livestreamed by alternative-weekly newspaper Queen City Nerve, captured the encounter. According to The Washington Post, officials in North Carolina’s largest city had not imposed a curfew, and police used a loudspeaker to encourage straggling protesters to disperse or face arrest. The Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department later took to Twitter to explain projectiles had been hurled at them by protesters and “multiple avenues” were offered for leaving the area before the situation escalated when a line of riot police formed behind the demonstrators and advanced, corralling those refusing to depart. The incident drew harsh criticism from civic leaders, including State Rep. Chaz Beasley. Obama to address police violence in Wednesday livestream Update 3:18 a.m. EDT June 3: Former President Barack Obama will join a host of other leaders in a Wednesday livestream to “discuss the tragic events of recent weeks, the history of police violence in America, and specific action steps needed to transform a system that has led to the loss of too many lives.” The Obama Foundation confirmed the scheduled event early Wednesday morning. The livestream begins at 5 p.m. Washington state trooper heard telling officers in viral video, ‘Don’t kill them. Hit them hard’ Published 3 a.m. EDT June 3: A Washington state trooper heard rallying his troops in a viral video is being defended by his organization and skewered in the court of public opinion Wednesday morning. The unidentified trooper can be heard prepping his fellow officers for Seattle protesters by saying, ‘Don’t kill them. Hit them hard.” Chris Loftis, director of communications for the Washington State Patrol, told The Washington Post the trooper had been demonstrating a “push tactic” intended to “move a group of noncompliant or aggressive protesters.” “This is not, ‘Go out and strike people. This is move them away from the situation and from danger,” Loftis told the newspaper. The trooper featured in the video, which began circulating on Twitter Tuesday night, can be heard telling officers, “Don’t kill them, get them out of the way,” while making a pushing motion with his fists. “We’re aware of the video and we apologize for the poor choice of words by one of our team leaders,” Loftis said.
  • Florida State Attorney Melissa Nelson released Wednesday afternoon talking about the death of George Floyd and an overall message to the community. She states that the killing of Floyd in Minneapolis shocked and angered her.  “We will continue to work with our partners to protect peaceful protests taking place in our circuit. It is of chief importance to me that we continue to work together to make our community and our justice system better for everyone,” Nelson states. “Also, know those who resort to violence and who destroy property will be held accountable.” Nelson’s office handles criminal matters in Duval, Clay and Nassau counties. She finishes the latter by saying that her commitment to serving and protecting the citizens of Northeast Florida remains as strong as ever. READ FULL LETTER:

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